Holidays

This information is largely taken from Coru Cathubodua Priesthood.

  • Samhain: 30 October - 1 November

    • New Years' Day​

    • Celebrated for 5 days, with Samhain being the middle day

    • Begins with the Feast of Tlachta, which begins with lighting a fire and making offerings to her

    • On the second day should be the Festival of Tara, in which three feasts take place, one for each of the three goddesses of Ireland:

      • The Feast of Ériú​

      • The Feast of Banbha

      • The Feast of Fódhla

    • On the day of Samhain, the third day, is the Feast of the Mórrígan, as this day is fundamentally her devotional holy day. This feast is celebrated at night between 30 October and 1 November

    • On the fourth day is to be the Feast of War, in which the war goddesses are venerated:

      • The Feast of Badb

      • The Feast of Némain

      • The Feast of Macha

    • On the fifth day is the Feast of the Fallen, in which the warriors and heroes who have died are venerated. Ancestors and otherwise revered dead are also remembered and honoured during this day

  • The Feast of Goibniu: 6 December

    • Goibniu is the god of smithing and hospitality. Offerings can consist​ of virtually anything hand-made or home-made, especially beer and smithing-related things.

  • Winter Solstice: 21 December

    • This is also the Feast of the Dagda. "Observances for the Dagda should include acts of hospitality"​

    • Acceptable observances and offerings are:

      • Holding a feast

      • Sharing food with others, perhaps feeding the hungry or homeless

      • Offerings of beer, fresh bread, butter, and cauldrons of stew

      • Music-making, especially harp music, and the telling of stories

      • Some practitioners choose to hold vigil with fires lit through the night until the Solstice sunrise​

  • Imbolc: 1 February

    • Also called the Feast of Brigid.​

    • Acceptable offerings include:

      • Dairy products​

      • Beer

      • Whiskey

      • Honey

    • Brigid is honoured by:

      • Purification customs, particularly of warriors​

      • Making and sharing poetry in her honour

      • Lighting candles

      • Gathering the dew from the prior day on pieces of blessed cloth known as Brigid's cloak, which is said to be able to heal

  • The Feast of Cú Chulainn: 16 March

    • Acceptable offerings include:​

      • Horns of mead or beer​

      • The best portion of meat from the feast

    • He can be honoured by:

      • Martial practice or games (especially hurling)

      • Extra attention to dogs or charities for dogs.

  • The Feast of Scáthach: 23 April

    • Acceptable offerings are:​

      • Skye whiskey​

      • Hearty food and drink

    • She can be honoured by:

      • Engaging in martial activities​

  • Beltaine: 1 May

    • Also called Mayday, or the Feast of Nuada and the Tuatha Dé Danaan.

    • Acceptable offerings are:

      • Whiskey​

      • Beer

      • Spring foods

      • Seafoods

    • They can be honoured by:

      • Retelling the story of the Tuatha Dé Danann coming to Ireland and the First Battle of Mag Tuired.​

  • The Feast of Fionn mac Cumhaill: 13 June

    • Acceptable offerings:​

      • Ale​

      • Whiskey

      • Salmon

      • Venison

      • Wild game

    • He can be honoured by:

      • Reciting peoms​

      • Playing strategy games

      • Outdoor activities

      • Hunting

      • Archery

  • Summer Solstice: 20 June

    • Also the Feast of Manannán mac Lir.

    • Acceptable offerings:

      • Beer​

      • Seafoods

      • Summer foods

    • He can be honoured by:

      • Pouring ale into the sea​

      • Practicing the art of illusion

      • Partaking in druidic practices

      • Poetry

  • Lughnasadh: 1 August

    • This is the Feast of Lugh​

    • Acceptable offerings:

      • Ale or whiskey

      • Fruits of the season and grain products

      • Weapons and crafts

      • Demonstrations of skill​

    • Lugh and Tailtiu can be honoured by:

      • Bonfires​

      • Feasting

      • Games

      • Honouring the Gods in general

      • Giving thanks for harvest

      • Other community events

    • This is also considered a time for taking oaths, law-giving, getting married, horse racing, and remembering our ancestors.